visitors-center from northwest

01 – Columbus Visitors Center, Kevin Roche

The original Italianate-style building, facing Fifth Street, was built for John Storey in 1864, and later served many purposes: a lodge, a furniture store, a Boys club. It opened as the Visitors Center in 1973.

The expansion, by architect Kevin Roche, was completed in 1995, and features a bay window to showcase Yellow Neon Chandelier and Persians, designed by Dale Chihuly.

At the dedication ceremony, Xenia Miller told the crowd: “This house was once a warm and gracious home to an early family and their friends, it is now restored to offer, once again, a warm welcome, this time to all friends of our city. It expresses the oldest and best tradition we inherit and I feel the original owners would be proud of the new use to which it will serve.”

mm-large-arch-columbus-indiana
06 - Large Arch...

By Henry Moore

Moore is considered the most influential public sculptor of the twentieth century, and his Large Arch is the largest of its kind in the nation.

 

About Henry...

The original Italianate-style building, facing Fifth Street, was built for John Storey in 1864, and later served many purposes: a lodge, a furniture store, a Boys club. It opened as the Visitors Center in 1973.

The expansion, by architect Kevin Roche, was completed in 1995, and features a bay window to showcase Yellow Neon Chandelier and Persians, designed by Dale Chihuly.

At the dedication ceremony, Xenia Miller told the crowd: “This house was once a warm and gracious home to an early family and their friends, it is now restored to offer, once again, a warm welcome, this time to all friends of our city. It expresses the oldest and best tradition we inherit and I feel the original owners would be proud of the new use to which it will serve.”

06 – Large Arch, Henry moore

Henry Moore is considered the most influential public sculptor of the twentieth century, and his Large Arch is the largest of its kind in the nation.

Library architect architect I.M. Pei suggested a Henry Moore sculpture for the library plaza  – to provide contrast to the geometric, modernist buildings it sits between. Pei wanted the piece be interactive and requested that it be big enough for a couple to stroll through.

Henry Moore said, “As a young sculptor, I saw Stonehenge and ever since I’ve wanted to do work that could be walked through and around.”

The sculpture was designed at Moore’s home and studio an hour north of London, England.

The green patina is a natural, aged look for bronze, and was created through a special process, directed personally by the sculptor at the foundry.

The sculpture was commissioned by J. Irwin and Xenia S. Miller and gifted to the City of Columbus in 1971.

Henry Moore is considered the most influential public sculptor of the twentieth century, and his Large Arch is the largest of its kind in the nation.

Library architect architect I.M. Pei suggested a Henry Moore sculpture for the library plaza  – to provide contrast to the geometric, modernist buildings it sits between. Pei wanted the piece be interactive and requested that it be big enough for a couple to stroll through.

Henry Moore said, “As a young sculptor, I saw Stonehenge and ever since I’ve wanted to do work that could be walked through and around.”

The sculpture was designed at Moore’s home and studio an hour north of London, England.

The green patina is a natural, aged look for bronze, and was created through a special process, directed personally by the sculptor at the foundry.

The sculpture was commissioned by J. Irwin and Xenia S. Miller and gifted to the City of Columbus in 1971.

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mm-large-arch-columbus-indiana

06
Large Arch, Henry moore

Henry Moore is considered the most influential public sculptor of the twentieth century, and his Large Arch is the largest of its kind in the nation.

Library architect architect I.M. Pei suggested a Henry Moore sculpture for the library plaza  – to provide contrast to the geometric, modernist buildings it sits between. Pei wanted the piece be interactive and requested that it be big enough for a couple to stroll through.

Henry Moore said, “As a young sculptor, I saw Stonehenge and ever since I’ve wanted to do work that could be walked through and around.”

The sculpture was designed at Moore’s home and studio an hour north of London, England.

The green patina is a natural, aged look for bronze, and was created through a special process, directed personally by the sculptor at the foundry.

The sculpture was commissioned by J. Irwin and Xenia S. Miller and gifted to the City of Columbus in 1971.

[ MUST-SEE SITE ]

visitors-center from northwest
Learn more...

The original Italianate-style building, facing Fifth Street, was built for John Storey in 1864, and later served many purposes: a lodge, a furniture store, a Boys club. It opened as the Visitors Center in 1973.

The expansion, by architect Kevin Roche, was completed in 1995, and features a bay window to showcase Yellow Neon Chandelier and Persians, designed by Dale Chihuly.

At the dedication ceremony, Xenia Miller told the crowd: “This house was once a warm and gracious home to an early family and their friends, it is now restored to offer, once again, a warm welcome, this time to all friends of our city. It expresses the oldest and best tradition we inherit and I feel the original owners would be proud of the new use to which it will serve.”

01 – Columbus Visitors Center, Kevin Roche

The original Italianate-style building, facing Fifth Street, was built for John Storey in 1864, and later served many purposes: a lodge, a furniture store, a Boys club. It opened as the Visitors Center in 1973.

The expansion, by architect Kevin Roche, was completed in 1995, and features a bay window to showcase Yellow Neon Chandelier and Persians, designed by Dale Chihuly.

At the dedication ceremony, Xenia Miller told the crowd: “This house was once a warm and gracious home to an early family and their friends, it is now restored to offer, once again, a warm welcome, this time to all friends of our city. It expresses the oldest and best tradition we inherit and I feel the original owners would be proud of the new use to which it will serve.”

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