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MOBILE MAP STOPS 25-30

Mill Race Park covered bridge

25 – Mill Race Park

Landscape Management recognized this 85-acre riverfront park as one of the top 100 parks in the nation for design, reputation, and accessibility. Designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh, and featuring structures by Stanley Saitowitz, it includes an 84-foot observation tower, a covered bridge, people trails, fishing at two lakes, picnic shelters, playground equipment, basketball courts, and an amphitheater that hosts concerts and performances. Located in an oxbow bend of the Flatrock River in downtown Columbus, this 85-acre site experiences flooding, so all structures and plantings are designed to tolerate the floods.

Skopos detail

26 – Skopos

A series of “follies” that become micro-destinations are found throughout the park, all designed in collaboration with Stanley Saitowitz.

These structures, highlighted with a signature red painted metal, include a dramatic arc of lights that frame the entrance to the park, an observation tower (that provides a terrific view of downtown Columbus), a boathouse, a river lookout, a fishing pier, the amphitheater stage, an arbor, restrooms, and picnic shelters.

Saitowitz’s creative playfulness is on display with the restrooms with curved roofs signifying an M and W.

Take me to Skopos.

Mill Race ampitheater

27 – Structural Follies

A series of “follies” that become micro-destinations are found throughout the park, all designed in collaboration with Stanley Saitowitz.

These structures, highlighted with a signature red painted metal, include a dramatic arc of lights that frame the entrance to the park, an observation tower (that provides a terrific view of downtown Columbus), a boathouse, a river lookout, a fishing pier, the amphitheater stage, an arbor, restrooms, and picnic shelters.

Saitowitz’s creative playfulness is on display with restrooms that have curved roofs signifying an M and W.

Mill Race covered bridge, photo by Yvette Kuhlman

28 – Covered Bridge

The New Brownsville Covered Bridge is the focal point of a beautiful circular pond in the award-winning Mill Race Park, created by the legendary landscape designer Michael Van Valkenburgh. The hundred-foot bridge is the only Long-truss structure in Indiana and it can transport you all the way back to 1840, when it was built to cross the East Fork of the Whitewater River near Brownsville. The bridge is also a stop on The Indiana Covered Bridge Loop. The bridge is also an ideal backdrop for selfies for your Facebook and Instagram posts!

Mill Race Center, from southeast

29 – Mill Race Center

Myron Goldsmith of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill designed the International-style building in 1971 of glass and steel and provided onlookers with a window into the newspaper business.

The open concept reflects the daily newspaper’s role as a central link in the information highway.

Goldsmith’s design provided onlookers with a window into the business of communications. The open concept reflects the seven-day newspaper’s role as a central link in the information for the community. Originally, the paper’s printing presses could be viewed from the street, as they printed the daily paper. 

The Republic was the seventh Columbus structure to be named an historic landmark, The U.S. Interior said, “The Republic is an exceptional work of modern architecture and one of the best examples of the work of Myron Goldsmith, a general partner in the firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, and a highly respected architect, architect”

The AIA (American Institute of Architects) gave the building an Honor award in 1975, one of five recognized in Columbus by the AIA.

Century 21, by Thomas Beeby

30 – Century 21 Office Building

Thomas Beeby was dean of the Yale School of Architecture from 1985 until 1992, and director of the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1980 to 1985. He is chairman emeritus of HBRA Architects in Chicago – for forty years he was the principal who oversaw the planning and design of projects that included the Harold Washington Library Center in Chicago and the Bass Library at Yale.

Beeby was also one of the Chicago Seven – “In 1976, a group of Chicago architects joined forces to start a postmodern group in protest of a Miesian architectural movement taking over Chicago. Believing an art exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art, One Hundred Years of Architecture in Chicago, distorted reality because of the strong emphasis on Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the architects began planning their own exhibits and shows. This proved to be the impetus for their national recognition.” – From the WTTW website

Take me to Century 21.

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